Public safety gets a boost from the Alliant Energy Foundation

Public safety efforts in 24 communities received $24,700 from the Alliant Energy Foundation.

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A group of preschool students toured the Mount Pleasant Volunteer Fire Department and met Sparky, an animatronic mascot that teaches kids about fire safety. Jeff Beavers, far right, is an Alliant Energy gas mechanic, and a 40-year veteran and assistant chief of the fire department.

The Foundation provides Hometown Safety Grants to assist communities in protecting public health and safety. The grants help defray the costs of life-saving and other protective equipment.

Examples include defibrillators in public buildings; community emergency alert systems or personal protective equipment for public safety personnel.

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Hometown Safety Grants are awarded for specific, one-time, safety-related projects that benefit a wide range of people and can be completed within one year. For more information, visit alliantenergy.com/foundation

The Alliant Energy Foundation is funded solely by Alliant Energy shareowners.

 

Alliant Energy announces new Upland Prairie Wind Farm

IMG_0230Alliant Energy’s Iowa energy company continues moving toward a cleaner energy future with the start of major construction on its next wind farm in spring 2018. The company finalized an agreement with Apex Clean Energy for Upland Prairie Wind Farm. The 300-megawatt project is located in Clay and Dickinson counties in northwest Iowa.

“We are bringing more clean and cost-competitive wind energy to our customers,” said Doug Kopp, president of Alliant Energy’s Iowa energy company. “If our second wind expansion project is approved, one third of our energy in Iowa will be from wind, starting in 2020.”

This project will add construction and other jobs, as well as tens of millions of dollars in additional property taxes to the local communities and lease payments to landowners.

“Apex wind projects are designed to meet the needs of forward-thinking utilities such as Alliant Energy,” said Mark Goodwin, president and CEO of Apex. “We share the same priorities, especially strong community partnerships.”

Alliant Energy received approval in 2016 to add up to 500 megawatts of wind energy. The company has requested a similar expansion from the Iowa Utilities Board again in 2017. The combined projects would represent a $1.8 billion investment and add up to 1,000 megawatts of new wind generation in Iowa. Together, that’s enough to power up to 430,000 Iowa homes a year.

Upland Prairie Wind Farm facts:

  • Number of turbines: 121
  • Size of project: 300 megawatts
  • Annual energy output: enough for about 130,000 homes a year
  • Local tax benefits: more than $40 million over the life of the project
  • Landowner payments: approximately $45 million for the next 25 years

Let your nose be your guide

How do you raise awareness about natural gas leaks? Bring the smell directly to the people.

gas scratch and sniff 2017_edited

Alliant Energy’s scratch-and-sniff bill insert contains the smell of natural gas.

Alliant Energy is including a scratch-and-sniff bill insert containing the smell of natural gas in customers’ utility bills in the coming month. Under normal conditions, you may never be exposed to its smell. We’re sending out these special brochures so our customers can experience the odor in a safe way – it’ll help them better recognize a natural gas leak or emergency in the future.

“Because natural gas is colorless and has no scent, we add a strong odorant  to help you detect a possible gas leak,” said Richard Sublett, Senior Manager Compliance & Operational Performance.

The odorant, called mercaptan, contains sulfur, which mimics the smell of rotten eggs.

“Whenever anyone smells natural gas at their home or business, they should immediately leave the area and from a safe distance call 1-800-ALLIANT (1-800-255-4268),” Sublett said.

 

Alliant Energy crews to assist with Hurricane Irma response

Crew departing for Florida

Senica Fisher, line mechanic in Cedar Rapids, Iowa, is one of roughly 200 workers preparing to head to Florida to help restore power to those affected by Hurricane Irma.

Alliant Energy trucks will hit the road early Tuesday morning to assist in the massive effort to restore power across Florida following Hurricane Irma.

In total, roughly 200 personnel from Iowa and Wisconsin have volunteered to spend the next two weeks away from their families to help the restoration efforts. This group includes line workers, safety staff, vehicle mechanics, support staff and managers.

Our personnel and contractors are joining more than 18,000 utility crews from across 30 states and Canada working to restore power to more than 6 million people.

In addition, tree trimmers and other contractors paused their work for our customers to lend their expertise to the recovery.

Florida utilities requested help through a national mutual assistance program among utilities. Typically, power companies close to an event respond. In this case, some local energy companies are already assisting with the response to Hurricane Harvey, and the damage from Hurricane Irma was so extensive that the request for help extended to energy companies in the Midwest.

Our customers have benefited from this assistance when major storms hit our area. The most recent examples occurred in Iowa with the ice storm of 2007 and the floods of 2008. The last time our crews were needed in other parts of the country was 2012 when Superstorm Sandy hit the East Coast.

We balance providing help with the need to keep enough staff on hand in the event of storms here. Our customers do not pay for the costs of this mutual assistance. The costs are borne by the utilities that request help.

Updates on our efforts will be posted here and on our Facebook page.

Drive electric events next week in Madison, Dubuque and Cedar Rapids

Thinking about driving electric? Try it for free!MSN public EV chargers cropped

Hear from electric vehicle owners and see how EV technology has improved. Consumers are often surprised by:

  • Instant torque
  • Quiet and smooth ride
  • Financial savings

National Drive Electric Week is September 9 to 16, 2017, and we will be offering ride and drive events for those wanting to learn more.

Ride, drive and learn at these three events:

The event will showcase electric vehicles from local dealerships and owners, charging stations, and informational exhibits.

These events are among more than 200 taking place across the country during the fifth annual National Drive Electric Week, presented by Plug in America, the Sierra Club and the Electric Auto Association.

Rebates for installing home and workplace chargers are available to customers of Alliant Energy. Maps of charging stations are available at plugshare.com.

See how we’re creating a sustainable future

CSR Cover.jpgWe just released our 2017 Corporate Sustainability Report showing our progress toward a sustainable future by reducing carbon emissions by 34% since 2005 and increasing investments in renewable energy.

We also cut fossil fuel generation water withdrawals by over 25% since 2005 with plans targeting a reduction of 75 percent by 2030.

“Sustainability means doing the right thing with an eye toward the long run,” said Alliant Energy’s Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer Patricia Kampling. “So our sustainability strategy looks into the future, promoting responsible company growth through the economic, social and environmental decisions we make today.”

We continue to transform our generation profile to meet the future needs of our customers in a sustainable way. Between 2005 and 2018, our company will have permanently retired nearly 1,000 megawatts of coal-fired generation, and we’re planning to add over 1,000 megawatts of new, low-cost wind capacity by 2020.

Cleaner natural gas facilities are also being brought into our resource mix. Wind works hand-in-hand with natural gas generation, which can adjust up and down quickly to provide reliable power as the wind increases or decreases.

In 2016, renewable energy made up 15% of our company’s rated electric capacity. By 2024, that is expected to nearly double as we pursue new investments in wind and other renewable generation.

In addition, the report touches on topics like safety, our workplace, grid reliability, community support and corporate giving. The publication wraps up with a section that includes environmental and other performance data.

View highlights and the full report.

We’re advancing clean, cost-effective energy with another proposed wind project

Our Iowa energy company is pursuing another major wind investment that will help solidify the state’s national leadership in renewable energy. On August 3, 2017, we filed to get approval from the Iowa Utilities Board to add up to 500 megawatts of wind energy in Iowa. A decision is expected in early 2018.

“The customers and communities we serve will benefit from this cost effective clean energy,” said Doug Kopp, president of Alliant Energy’s Iowa energy company. “Our wind projects will help keep energy costs stable over the long-term for customers.”

We received approval in 2016 for a similar expansion. The combined projects would represent a $1.8 billion investment and add up to 1,000 megawatts of new wind generation in Iowa. That’s enough to power up to 430,000 Iowa homes a year. As a result, wind is expected to be more than one-third of our Iowa energy mix in 2020

“Iowa has seen tremendous benefits from the expansion of the wind energy industry in our state. We appreciate Alliant Energy continuing to invest in wind and other renewable energy sources to power our state,” said Bill Northey, Iowa Secretary of Agriculture.

Our wind expansion projects are expected to create hundreds of construction and other jobs while generating tens of millions of dollars in additional property taxes and payments to landowners.

Financial information

  • Alliant Energy’s Iowa energy company (Interstate Power and Light) filed an application for advance rate-making principles on August 3, 2017 (RPU-2017-0002). The key principles requested in the application include:
  • Cost cap of $1,780/kilowatt, including allowance for funds used during construction (AFUDC) and transmission costs
  • 11.0% return on common equity (ROE)
  • 40 year depreciable life
  • 10% AFUDC ROE used for modeling that allows for the higher of 10% or the 2016 test year base rate review result
  • In service by end of 2020